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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: it looked like a scene from a movie, but it was all too real. a meteor came crashing down to earth today, triggered a fireball over russia, and sent people running for cover. parts of the meteor fell on the city of chelyabinsk-- population over a million-- about a thousand miles due west of moscow on the edge of the ural mountains. the strike shocked and stunned the world. more than 1,000 people were injured. paul davies of independent television news begins our coverage. >> reporter: emerging from the russian sky, a giant ball of flame, a meteorite providing a spectacu
for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: it looked like a scene from a movie, but it was all too real. a meteor came crashing down to earth today, triggered a fireball over russia, and sent people running for cover. parts of the meteor fell on the city of chelyabinsk-- population over a million-- about a thousand miles due west of moscow on the edge of the ural mountains. the strike shocked and stunned the world. more than 1,000 people were injured. paul davies of independent television news begins our coverage. >> reporter: emerging from the russian sky, a giant ball of flame, a meteorite providing a spectacular show until it suddenly explodes 30 miles above the earth. the city of chelyabinsk was unlucky to be beneath the meteorites flight path and was showered with debris dropping from the sky. thousands of windows were smashed, shocked workers evacuated their offices. this school class is about to be interrupted by the shock wave. here the windows come crashing in, and a national judo squad runs for cover. c
. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... and friends of the newshour. >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: with just a week left before automatic spending cuts are set to begin, the obama administration stepped up pressure on republicans in congress today. the latest warnings came over the potential impact that furloughs would have on air trav, starng in apl. transportation secretary ray lahood said travelers could face new delays of 90 minutes at major airports in chicago, new york and san francisco. more than 100 air control towers at smaller airports could be closed, lahood said. airlines likely would cancel flights. and c
. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: another defiant act by north korea today. the nation carried out its third nuclear test, triggering new fears and a global outcry. the announcement blared forth on north korean state television. >> main purpose of this nuclear test is to show the resentment of our people and army of the united states' hostile actions that are no better than robbery. our nuclear test is a fair self-defensive action which does not contravene any international law. >> brown: the underground blast took place at a remote location in the north eastern part of
, and welcome to this "pbs newshour" special coverage of president obama's "state of the union" address. we want you to know this program is also being livestreamed on our home page on the web. in just a few moments, the president will spell out his policy agenda for the start of his second term. he is expected tonight to focus mainly on jobs and the economy, and to highlight other domestic priorities including gun control and immigration reform, but also to touch on international challenges. here with me, as they will be throughout our coverage tonight, are syndicated columnist mark shields and "new york times" columnist david brooks. mark, what is different about a state of the union when it's the first one of a second term? >> you don't have that many more to look forward to? the sand is running out of the glass. this is probably the best shot that most presidents have in their second term is that first year-and-a-half before you get into congressional elections and the lame duckness really sets in. the race to succeed him begins while he's just sitting there. so this is important. this is th
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)